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Articles:13 Reasons to Remember 2013 in League of Legends

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13 Reasons to Remember 2013 In League of Legends
2013 marks Riot Games' direct involvement in professional League of Legends in Europe and North America, as competitive LoL transitioned into a more professional format. Highlights include the League Championship Series, Visas being granted by the US Government, and even some plans for Challenger teams coming into 2014.

However, thirteen stories stood above all as the most memorable parts of 2013. Whether they elicit fond memories of what was or warm your heart, we at Leaguepedia hope you have an agreeable read. In no particular order:

1. Puszu's illustrious run within Fnatic

Fnatic struggled to find a rhythm off the back of their first place finish in the Spring Split. A 4-6 start in the Summer Split led the team to pave the way for Rekkles's return. With YellOwStaR's switch to support, the team settled on a highly proficient AD carry straight out of soloqueue, puszu. The team reaped victories in bundles on their way to the Season 3 World Semifinals, and the Estonian's play drew unanimous acclaim. His days in Fnatic may be over, but he has publicly voiced his gratefulness for the short-term experience.

2. EG: The Great Divide

Evil Geniuses (formerly CLG.EU) failed to qualify for the Season 3 World Championship. With Snoopeh, Krepo and Yellowpete intent on starting the NA adventure, EG moved to NA without Wickd and Froggen, who elected to kick-start Alliance's LoL adventures. The two teams (EG and [A]) looked extremely sharp in their recent appearances: respectively 3-0 over DTG, and 2-0 over Dignitas

3. Cloud 9: Above NA Clouds

Cloud 9's journey to NA LCS dominance started with an upset elimination in the group stages of the S3 LCS Spring Qualifiers. Under the leadership of Hai and LemonNation, the team trained with the Summer LCS in mind. Empowered by the presence of Meteos, Cloud 9 swept compLexity Gaming 3-0 en route to a 30-3 Summer Split record, playoffs included. Cloud 9's international experience features two Bo3s against EU powerhouse Fnatic, which they split 1-apiece.

4. Taipei Assassins: End of an era

The Season 2 World Champions lost their manager, Erika, as she departed due to health issues. Since then, dissension amongst the team led to the formation of the Taipei Snipers (with MiSTakE at the helm). By the end of June, Toyz's health forced him to retire, and Stanley stepped down. Lilballz was initially a substitute, but an Elo boosting incident precipitated his retirement. TPA failed to re-qualify for the Season 3 World Championship, as the surprising Gamania Bears (now Yoe Flash Wolves) decisively edged them.

5. Edward's move to Curse (and back to Gambit)

In early June and despite a promising second-place finish in the LCS Spring Split, Edward departed from Gambit Gaming, citing communication issues as the main factor. Two weeks into his NA stint with Team Curse, he wanted to return to EU. His improvements at communication and will to win allowed Curse to reach the playoffs despite a bad start. Initially rumored as a member of the SuperTeam, the Armenian support returned to Gambit. Since then, the Russian team showed they were back to the dominance characteristic of their Moscow Five days.

6. SK Telecom T1 Faker

SK Telecom T1 enlisted Korean Soloqueue star Faker within their Judgment Day squad. The prodigy instantly wowed observers and players with his LeBlanc display against MVP Blue, but he was not done yet. A Zed outduel against KT Ryu prompted the #ThingsFakerDoes theme, and the player spearheaded his team's conquest of the Season 3 World Champion title.

7. Legacy redefinitions: SK, CLG

SK Gaming and Counter Logic Gaming once flirted with greatness, but Season 3 proved arduous for the two squads. SK found itself one game away from LCS relegation, whereas CLG shed its oldest faces without the threat of relegation.

SK's woes date to the Summer Split, and the organization opted for a wholesale roster shuffle. Out went ocelote, Kev1n, and hyrqBot; in came the inexperienced Jesiz, and the battle-tested Svenskeren and Fredy122. Down 2-0 against SUPA HOT CREW XD, the squad broke through at the most important time. Nyph, who helped them communicate at the most important time, left after delivering SK to safe harbor.

On the other hand, CLG's revolution started with HotshotGG's retirement shortly after the Spring Split. Chauster and Bigfatlp followed suit after a fifth place Summer finish. The Counter Logic Experiment now features Nien, Dexter (still in tryouts), Link, and the Rush Hour duo (Doublelift and Aphromoo). Among these players, Doublelift is the sole player remaining from CLG's 2011 squad.

8. Tabe: The Artisan of Royal Club Huang Zu

One of the S3 World Championship highlights was Royal Club Huang Zu's ascension to the finals. The team gained popularity in Europe and North America overnight upon Sjokz's interview of the team's humble support, Tabe. The support once retired from competitive LoL, but he came back due to Wh1t3zZ's insistence. His impact was so resounding that Uzi, the team's AD carry at the time, refuses to play with any other support. Prior to his second retirement, Tabe made his discontent with the competitive Chinese scene known – enough to earn a ban from ACE, the governing body over most Chinese competitions.

9. TSM: Between performance and Gamecribs

Team SoloMid is one of the few teams that made minimal roster changes going into the Season 3 Spring Playoffs, as Wildturtle replaced Chaox amidst chemistry issues. WildTurtle's seamless integration within the lineup allowed TSM to snag two consecutive top two finishes in the NA region. The team's drama bouts endeared them to their fanbase as they struggled in the S3 World Championship, and Reginald opted to focus full-time on coaching and management, hiring Bjergsen as a replacement.

10. Quantic Gaming: Broken hearts and crushed dreams

The story started as three players from MiG Blitz moved to NA alongside Locodoco and joined the Quantic Gaming banner.

Underwhelming early showings predated ALCS dominion, and the team qualified to the Spring Promotion group stages at their second try. In groups, they started 2-0 on the first day, but an 0-3 second day signaled the end of Quantic's LCS chances.

Locodoco was the most affected player by Quantic's setback, as it precipitated his return to Korea, and reality caught up to him the hardest. He is currently eyeing studies, and he is 99% sure he will not be involved in the professional League of Legends scene anymore.

11. Battle of the Atlantic: Settling the score, or adding more oil?

Riot Games attempted to settle the score once and for all between Europe and North America. Over the span of five games, one region emerged victorious on the basis of points earned. EU partisans highlight the region's three victories as opposed to NA's two, but North America emerged victorious in points (5 to 4). Ultimately, Riot only fueled an already ardent blaze, which stems from the All Star Game. Speaking of which...

12. The 2013 All-Star Game

It is hard to select a few shining points in an action-packed event. This is merely an attempt at selecting some of the moments:

  • sOAZ and Wickd's memorable 1v1 that decided of EU's top lane representative
  • inSec's rise to prominence (with his trademark “inSec” vs EU, and 1v1 win over Diamondprox)
  • The crazy Game 1 between Europe and North America, concluding in Doublelift's pentakill
  • Toyz's last appearance on the international stage (and his triumph in the mid challenge)
  • The play of China's PDD and Korea's MadLife over the whole tournament

13. The xPeke

A timeless display of skill, combined with flair for the dramatic. It is best left to the eyes of the observers to describe it, and to remember what they were doing when Fnatic xPeke made a play for the ages.


Written by Adel "Hype Algerian" Chouadria - @HypeAlgerian
Edited by Jordan Spence - @SanctifiedLoL


Do you think one of these moments stands above the rest? Maybe we missed the moment you were looking forward to reading about, in which case you can let us know in the comment section down below.


Anonymous user #1

294 days ago
Score 0+-
You forgot to include WildTurtle's first LCS game as Caitlyn getting a PentaKill

Deligamer

294 days ago
Score 0+-
It was either that or Tabe's video, given the layout. I had to make a sacrifice :(

Anonymous user #2

294 days ago
Score 0+-
xPeke>all

Deligamer

294 days ago
Score 0+-
It even backdoored the article.

Anonymous user #3

294 days ago
Score 2+-
Keyd vs Incredible Miracle - IEM SP

Anonymous user #4

293 days ago
Score 0+-
No mention of a brand new team (SKT T1 #2 at the time) coming from nowhere to win the world finals while only losing one BO series since their entrance into their first season of OGN, where they lost to O-zone who went on to beat Blaze to win the title in the Spring series, they would they then beat KTB in a reverse all kill to win Champions Summer and storm the world championships and win it all, and for some reason this is a better story line than edward coming to America for some money and going back? Jesus.

Deligamer

293 days ago
Score 0+-

SKT T1: I elected to focus on Faker, but you've got a point. Wrong focus on my part, even though I had the facts right in front of me. That, and may have needed focus on the KTB/SKT K angle, as the two teams also faced each other in the deciding Bo5 with a World Championship spot at stakes.

Edward: The move kickstarted a trend (EU to NA, which Evil Geniuses, Dexter, and Bjergsen followed) and made Gambit's botlane foundations unstable. Upon Edward's return to Gambit, the Russian team's performances went back to M5 caliber. How could I *not* highlight it?

Httkscorpion

292 days ago
Score 0+-
As well, although they won the championship, the article is about how the game evolved in the western world. SKT was really good, but I don't think they evolved the actual game, per se, just specific champions.

Anonymous user #5

293 days ago
Score 0+-
YOU GOT XPEKE'D!

Anonymous user #6

293 days ago
Score -1+-
So much focus on the 2 shittiest regions.

Httkscorpion

292 days ago
Score -1+-
I think NA and EU are actually 2nd and 3rd. No one denies Korea is the best, but that is the case for any pro game out there.

Anonymous user #6

291 days ago
Score 1+-
China's better than NA and EU.

Anonymous user #7

285 days ago
Score 0+-
Brokenshard and Arthelon talking shit and then getting stomped by EG and red buff should have taken spot #1-13

Anonymous user #8

283 days ago
Score 0+-
Kha' Ich. WHERE IS HE?

Anonymous user #9

257 days ago
Score 0+-
lol

Anonymous user #9

257 days ago
Score 0+-

Troll

GGWP
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